Archives

********* DO NOT EDIT THIS PAGE!!! NO, NOT EVER, FOR ANY REASON! NO, NOT EVEN YOU. It WILL screw up your blog *********** ****************** Editing this page will destroy the javascript that calls the twitter button. **************************** ************************ Let Alex or Austin know if any changes need to be made to this page. ****************************** PET DISH  

Dishing on all things animals.

Reporter Pamela Gould and Emma are a registered pet therapy team. Email pgould@freelancestar.com.

Share
RSS feed of this blog

Hearing in dog attack case postponed

MORE: Read more Spotsylvania County news

This Friday’s hearing on whether a Spotsylvania County woman’s dog should be declared dangerous has been postponed by one week.

The hearing had been scheduled for 9:30 a.m. in Spotsylvania General District Court. The county attorney handling the case said it has been delayed until March 7 at noon.

Latoya Johnson, 33, of Hastings Count in the Lancaster Gate subdivision, was charged with letting her dog run at large and not having a county license for the dog after her dog reportedly killed another dog in the  subdivision on Jan. 12. Both charges are misdemeanors.

The dangerous dog classification is not a criminal charge but a legal classification. An earlier story provides details on the classification and the requirements associated with it.

Deputies were called to Hastings Court at 11:45 a.m. on Jan. 12 for reports of a pit bull attacking another dog, Sheriff’s Capt. Jeff Pearce said.

A woman was walking her Maltese when the pit bull got out of its owner’s house or yard, according to witnesses.

The woman attempted to keep the pit bull away by picking up the Maltese and calling for help, but the pit pull jumped up, grabbed the little dog from her arms and killed it, Pearce said.

This report provided information on safety when dealing with any dog. report.

Permalink: http://news.fredericksburg.com/petdish/2014/02/25/hearing-in-dog-attack-case-postponed/

Comments guidelines

1. Be respectful. No personal attacks.
2. Please avoid offensive, vulgar, abusive, hateful or defamatory language.
3. Read and follow THE RULES.
4. Please notify us by flagging posts that are inappropriate.

Posts that include links, and posts from users with unverified e-mail addresses may take longer to appear.

  • ThatsWhatHeSays

    I would never let my dog near a pit bull. You can love them all you want, but they are a very dangerous breed.

    • anon

      “pit bull” not an actual breed. I had a friend with a golden lab when I was younger, it ate their cat literally ate it. No one put that dog down, why? It was a “family dog” dangerous is a relative term and should be limited to define the owners not the animals.

      • ThatsWhatHeSays

        Pitbulls are inherently more aggressive than other types of dogs. These stories are becoming all too common with pitbulls. If people can’t handle a pitbull or train them properly, they should not own them. I agree with you on that.

    • ustateach09

      She didn’t let the pitbull near her dog, the pitbull came after them.

      • ThatsWhatHeSays

        Even worse! LOL

  • separationcs

    Terrible beasts, those Molosser/pit breeds.

  • adv1sor

    Was Johnson ever convicted of the misdemeanor charges? Given what happened, why wouldn’t the dog be considered dangerous?

  • LisaAnne

    ALL DOGS- big or small, dangerous or not NEED TO BE ON A LEASH! Any thing can make them snap and attack, even your small, sweet, and innocent Fluffy!

  • JackRudolph

    Sooooo sick and tired of pit bulls as some sort of status symbol.

  • Tom

    If you want to own a pit bull you have to stand responsible for that dogs action. Is the dog dangerous? of course it is. Why was it off a leash is the owners problem and they should pay some retribution for letting this dangerous dog out. Another person mentioned these dogs are a sort of status symbol and I agree a lot of owners buy them for just that reason.

  • AL811

    No matter what type of dog it is the owner is responsible for its action. When anything attacks without provocation to kill it is dangerous. I would submit even people in that same category. Thats why we have jail terms for murder.

  • ustateach09

    ” reportedly killed another dog in the subdivision on Jan. 12?” the dod was killed, there isn’t anything reportedly about it. I’m glad the woman wasn’t out with a young child.

  • Thomas McCartney

    Merritt Clifton Editor OF Animal People:

    Of the 4,558 dogs involved in fatal and disfiguring attacks on humans occurring in the U.S. & Canada since September 1982, when I began logging the data, 2,923 (64%) were pit bulls; 541 were Rottweilers; 3,696 were of related molosser breeds, including pit bulls, Rottweilers, mastiffs, boxers, and their mixes.

    Of the 523 human fatalities, 269 were killed by pit bulls; 84 were killed by Rottweilers; 392 (75%) were killed by molosser breeds.

    Of the 2,593 people who were disfigured, 1,753 (67%) were disfigured by pit bulls; 319 were disfigured by Rottweilers; 2,169 (83%) were disfigured by molosser breeds.

    Pit bulls–exclusive of their use in dogfighting–also inflict about 10 times as many fatal and disfiguring injuries on other pets and livestock as on humans, a pattern unique to the pit bull class.

    Surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption indicate that pit bulls and pit mixes are less than 6% of the U.S. dog population; molosser breeds, all combined, are 9%.

  • Thomas McCartney

    Council Bluffs, Iowa.
    Pit bulls are not only problematic in large cities; they threaten mid-sized cities and small towns as well. Located in the heartland, Council Bluffs, Iowa has about 60,000 citizens.

    After a series of devastating attacks, beginning in 2003, Council Bluffs joined over 600 U.S. cities and began regulating pit bulls.

    The results of the Council Bluffs pit bull ban, which began January 1, 2005, show the positive effects such legislation can have on public safety in just a few years time:1.

    Council Bluffs: Pit Bull Bite Statistics.

    Year Pit Bull Bites % of All Bites.
    2004 29 23%.
    2005 12 10% (year ban enacted).
    2006 6 4%.
    2007 2 2%.
    2008 0 0%.
    2009 0 0%.
    2010 1 1%.
    2011 0 0%

  • Thomas McCartney

    Miss Universe Canada has joined the fight for a pit bull ban in B.C., and plans to make the effort a major part of her reign.

    Sahar Biniaz, 26, was crowned Miss Universe Canada on May 19, and thinks the provincial government should adopt either a pit bull ban or at least require that pit bulls must be leashed and muzzled at all times.

    The Richmond resident was a victim of a pit bull attack herself at the age of 14, a year after her family adopted a five-month-old pit bull from a breeder.

    The pit bull “came from a really nice environment,” she said, but “then I ended up getting 16 stitches.” Biniaz still bears the scars on her chest to this day.

    “I was just sitting down and it just kept staring at me, and I don’t know what aggravated it,” she said. “It just all of sudden… went off.”

    Biniaz said her parents ended up getting rid of the pit bull as opposed to putting it down, but every time she hears of a pit bull attack she remembers that day.

    “This is something you hear all the time, over and over again,” she said, noting that with her Miss Universe Canada title she now has “a voice… to bring more awareness to this [issue].”

    Biniaz said recent pit bull attacks — like the one on Emma-Leigh Cranford, 4, on Aug. 23 in White Rock — spurred her to act.

    Cranford survived with 40 stitches across her jaw, but not before a two-hour surgery at B.C. Children’s Hospital.

    Biniaz said she has already spoken with White Rock Coun. Alan Campbell, who said he would bring up the possibility of a ban when council reconvenes Sept. 17.

  • Thomas McCartney

    Toronto dog bites fell after pit bull ban
    Patrick Cain, Global News : Monday, November 14, 2011 02:12 PM

    The number of dog bites reported in Toronto has fallen since a ban on pit bulls took effect in 2005, public health statistics show.

    A total of 486 bites were recorded in 2005. That number fell generally in the six years following, to 379 in 2010.

    Provincial laws that banned ‘pit bulls,’ defined as pit bulls, Staffordshire terriers, American Staffordshire terriers, American pit bull terriers and dogs resembling them took effect in August 2005. Existing dogs were required to be sterilized, and leashed and muzzled in public.

    Bites in Toronto blamed on the four affected breeds fell sharply, from 71 in 2005 to only six in 2010. This accounts for most of the reduction in total bites.

    The fall in bites blamed on the four breeds tracks a reduction in the dogs themselves, data obtained separately byglobalnews.ca under access-to-information laws shows. Some 1,411 Toronto dogs were in the four breeds in 2008, as opposed to 798 in mid-2011.

    “It is encouraging to hear that fewer people are victimized by dangerous dogs,” Ontario Attorney-General John Gerretson said in a statement.

    About 1,000 Ontario pit bulls have been put down since the ban took effect.

    With totals of Toronto dogs by breed and ten years of bite data, it is possible to see which dogs are most likely to bite in Toronto based on a ratio between dogs of a given breed in 2011 and reported bites over the decade between 2000 and 2010. Below are the 20 most bite-prone dogs. The four prohibited breeds all appear in the top eight slots.

  • Thomas McCartney

    Research showing severe dog bites are fewer in Manitoba areas with pit bull bans.

    The study, conducted by University of Manitoba scientists, shows the number of dog bites requiring hospitalization have decreased since pit bull bans went into effect in 2005.

    It states the number of hospitalization attacks fell from 3.5 per 100,000 population to 2.8 after the legislation took effect.

    Many people feel the breed is inherently aggressive.

    The study doesn’t purport to be the last word on the issue but does contain some compelling data, particularly when comparing Brandon, which has never prohibited pit bulls and Winnipeg, which has, said study co-author, Dr. Malathi Raghavan

    “I would not claim this is the ultimate study … all dogs bite,” she said.

    But she said the data collected from 16 larger Manitoba jurisdictions, along with recent Spanish and Texas studies suggesting similar results, is compelling.

    “We should pay attention to the fact there is something going on here,” said Raghavan.

    The Spanish data showed similar hospitalization reductions in the absence of pit bulls while the Texas research indicated higher rates of death, severe injury and treatment costs are linked to the breed.

    Raghavan said she was careful to isolate the pit bull factor from others, such as changes in dog populations.

    “The legislation was a variable coming out significantly,” she said.

  • Thomas McCartney

    Wichita, Kansas
    In January 2009, the Wichita Department of Environmental Services released a number of pit bull statistics. The figures are based upon the Wichita Animal Control department’s investigation of 733 dog bites in 2008.

    Included in the data are pit bulls encountered by the Wichita Police Department. In the 1-year period, 95% of police encounters with aggressive dogs were pit bulls.

    The report also showed that the percentage of pit bull encounters had increased from 66% in 2004 to 95% in 2008. Subsequently, four months after the release of this data, the City of Wichita enacted a mandatory pit bull sterilization law.

    55% of all dogs deemed dangerous were pit bulls (41 pit bull dogs deemed dangerous).

    34% of attacks and bites involved pit bull dogs (246 pit bull attacks/bites).

    28% of dogs found running at large were pit bulls (1,279 pit bulls found running loose).

    25% of dogs impounded were pit bulls dogs (1,575 pit bulls impounded).

    37% of all dogs euthanized were pit bull dogs (1,255 pit bulls euthanized).

    23% of dog complaints involved pit bull dogs (2,523 complaints involved pit bull dogs).
    In a discussion of the Denver ban, Assistant City Attorney Kory Nelson recently told the San Francisco Chronicle that:

    “Since 1989, when that city instituted a pit bull ban, ‘we haven’t had one serious pit bull attack,’ said Kory Nelson, a Denver assistant city attorney. His city’s assertion that ‘pit bulls are more dangerous than other breeds of dog’ has withstood legal challenges, he said.

    ‘We were able to prove there’s a difference between pit bulls and other breeds of dogs that make pit bulls more dangerous,’ he said.”

    Sources: Denver Post
    ***************************************************
    Toronto:

    In a November 2011, public health statistics published by Global Toronto showed that pit bull bites dropped dramatically after Ontario adopted the Dog Owners Liability Act in 2005, an act that banned pit bulls:

    The number of dog bites reported in Toronto has fallen since a ban on pit bulls took effect in 2005, public health statistics show.

    A total of 486 bites were recorded in 2005. That number fell generally in the six years following, to 379 in 2010.

    Provincial laws that banned ‘pit bulls,’ defined as pit bulls, Staffordshire terriers, American Staffordshire terriers, American pit bull terriers and dogs resembling them took effect in August 2005. Existing dogs were required to be sterilized, and leashed and muzzled in public.

    Bites in Toronto blamed on the four affected breeds fell sharply, from 71 in 2005 to only six in 2010. This accounts for most of the reduction in total bites.
    ***************************************************

    Salina, KS

    Rose Base, director of the Salina Animal Shelter who lobbied for the ordinance, told the Salina Journal:

    The ordinance has made a difference, she said. Records at the Salina Animal Shelter indicate there were 24 reported pit bull bites in 2003 and 2004, and only five since — none from 2009 to present.

    Salina has 62 registered pit bulls, Base said. Before the ordinance she guessed there were “close to 300.” Since the first of this year three of the registered pit bulls have died of old age.

    “We definitely haven’t had the severity of bites that we had in the past,” Base said. “Our community has been somewhat safer because of the law that was passed
    ***************************************************
    Prince George’s County, MD
    Prince George’s County passed a pit bull ban in 1996. In August 2009, Rodney Taylor, associate director of the county’s Animal Management Group, said that the number of pit bull biting incidents has fallen:

    “Taylor said that during the first five to seven years of the ban, animal control officials would encounter an average of 1,200 pit bulls a year but that in recent years that figure has dropped by about half. According to county statistics, 36 pit bull bites, out of 619 total dog bites, were recorded in 2008, down from 95 pit bull bites, out of a total of 853, in 1996.”
    ***************************************************
    Salina KS (a second article)

    Note that they admit that the pit bull ban did not reduce the number of bites, but it did reduce the severity of bites reported by all breeds. Proof that when pit bull deniers find a jurisdiction that banned pit bulls, but reported no decrease in overall bites, is a moot point. Its death and dismemberment we are focusing on, not bite counts.

    In the monthly city newsletter, In Touch, published in September 2006, the City of Salina reported that the pit bull ban adopted in 2005 significantly reduced pit bull biting incidents in just a 12 month period.

    The number of pit bull bites depicted in the “Salina Pit Bull Bites Reported” graph shows 2002 with 13 pit bull bites, 2003 with 11 pit bull bites, 2004 with 15 pit bull bites and 2005 with only one bite. The newsletter notes that “animal bites reported have remained constant, but the severity of bites have decreased dramatically” since the enactment of the pit bull ban.
    ***************************************************
    Springfield, MO

    In April 2008, the Springfield-Greene County Health Department released data to a local TV station – following the City of Springfield’s adoption of a 2006 pit bull ban:

    “The Springfield-Greene County Health Department reports that dog bites and vicious dog complaints are declining since the implementation of the Pit Bull Ordinance in the City of Springfield two years ago. In 2005 the health department fielded 18 vicious dog complaints, but only eight in 2007. Bites were down from 102 in 2005 to 87 in 2007.”
    ***************************************************
    Washington

    In 2008, the City of Wapato passed an ordinance that bans new pit bulls, rottweilers and mastiffs. Nine months after its adoption, in March 2009, Wapato Police Chief Richard Sanchez reported successful results:

    “Nine months into the ban and police calls about vicious dogs have been cut in half. The Wapato Police tell Action News they’ve gone from 18 reports in January, February and March of last year to seven so far in ’09. “Seven calls in three months… that’s nothing,” says Chief Richard Sanchez, Wapato Police Department.

    Chief Sanchez credits local cooperation for the decline of dangerous dogs.”
    ***************************************************
    Rhode Island

    When the City of Woonsocket was debating a pit bull ordinance in June 2009, the animal control supervisor in Pawtucket, John Holmes, spoke about the enormous success of Pawtucket’s 2003 pit bull ban:

    “Holmes says he predicted that it would take two years for Pawtucket to experience the full benefit of the law after it was passed, but the results were actually apparent in half the time.

    “It’s working absolutely fantastic,” said Holmes. “We have not had a pit bull maiming in the city since December of 2004.”
    ***************************************************
    Per section 8-55 of Denvers pit bull ban:

    A pit bull, is defined as any dog that is an APBT, Am Staf Terrier, Staff Bull Terrier, or any dog displaying the majority of physical traits of anyone (1) or more of the above breeds, or any dog exhibiting those distinguishing characteristics which substantially conform to the standards set by the AKC or UKC for any of the above breed.

    Over the course of 22 years, the Denver ban has withstood numerous battles in state and federal courts. It has been used as a model for over 600 USA cities that legislate pit bulls, as well as US Navy, Air Force, Marine and Army bases ( so much for Sgt Stubby).

    without it, we’d see just what we see in Miss E’s lame replies. Every pit owner would claim their land shark was anything but a pit bull.

    Miami Dade county voted 66% to keep their pit bull ban, just as it is worded, last year

  • Thomas McCartney

    A pit bull BSL works EVERYWHERE it is useful in almost eliminating all serious dog attacks that maim, disfigure, dismember, maul, cripple.
    or kill, this is a simply proven fact in all cases.The number of pit bulls is dramatically reduced as are the numbers of them put to death.

    The need to have BSL is to have a preemptive capability to avoid a pit bull attack from happening due to it’s extremely savage consequences.

    It is enacted against all pit bulls as they all have the genetic DNA propensity to carry out these horrific attacks that are non existent in 99% of all other breeds, ban the breed and you ban the deed, simple as that.

    Dealing with an attack after the fact is simply not acceptable due to the horrific nature of said attacks.

    With any other breed other then Rottweiler’s, wolf hybrids and Akita’s and a few others in very small numbers it is not a naturally genetic reality for them to carry out such horrifying attacks.

    Hence they need to be dealt with in an aggressive reactive modality where all of the breed are not looked on as one but rather based on the actions of the individual misbehaving dog.

    This can be done in a very aggressive proactive manner so that as soon as a dog like a lab lets say starts behaving inappropriately severe consequences can be brought to bare on the owner and their dog in an escalating manner as needed to deal with a situation that has developed.

    This duel track approach can deal with the pits issue as other normal dog breeds can be dealt with as well so vicious dogs of other mainstream breeds are also held accountable for their actions.

    There should be mandatory Spay/Neuter programs for all breeds but clearly the one that needs it the most and where the most change would be effected would be with the Pit Bull type dog

  • Thomas McCartney

    “The LA Times (and other advocates) are fond of mentioning that many pit bulls live without incident as gentle pets. These advocates ignore more compelling facts.

    321 humans have been killed or disfigured by dogs during calendar year 2013; 316 of those attacks were by pit bulls.

    16 of the attacks have caused human fatalities, 15 of those deaths were caused by pit bulls.***.

    California leads the nation in fatal pit bull attacks with 25% of the nation’s total.

    To omit this essential information in an editorial opinion on pit bulls is tantamount to a lie of omission.”

    Pit Bulls Lead ‘Bite’ Counts Across U.S. Cities and Counties.
    Dog Biting Incidents: 2008 to 2012

    Animal control departments in at least 25 U.S. states report that pit bulls are biting more than all other dog breeds. These states include: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin.

    The oft-quoted myth by pro-pit bull groups that pit bulls “do not bite more than other breeds” is categorically false. In addition to leading bite counts, the pit bull bite is also the most damaging, inflicting permanent and disfiguring injury

  • Thomas McCartney

    Wapato, WA residents safer because of ban:

    In 2008, the City of Wapato passed an ordinance that bans new pit bulls, rottweilers and mastiffs. Nine months after its adoption, in March 2009, Wapato Police Chief Richard Sanchez reported successful results:

    “Nine months into the ban and police calls about vicious dogs have been cut in half. The Wapato Police tell Action News they’ve gone from 18 reports in January, February and March of last year to seven so far in ’09. “Seven calls in three months… that’s nothing,” says Chief Richard Sanchez, Wapato Police Department.

    Chief Sanchez credits local cooperation for the decline of dangerous dogs”

  • Thomas McCartney

    About 31,400 dogs attacked about 61,500 other animals in the U.S. in 2013, killing 43,500 and seriously injuring 18,100.

    The animals killed included about 12,000 dogs, 8,000 cats, 6,000 hooved animals, and 17,000 other small domestic animals, primarily poultry.

    The seriously injured included about 12,400 dogs, 4,000 cats, and 1,700 hooved animals. Few small mammals and poultry survived reported dog attacks.

    Pit bulls inflicted 99% of the total fatal attacks on other animals (43,000); 96% of the fatal attacks on other dogs (11,520); 95% of the fatal attacks on livestock (5,700) and on small mammals and poultry (16,150); and 94% of the fatal attacks on cats (11,280).

    About 30,000 pit bulls were involved in attacks on other animals, many of them killing multiple other animals.

    There are about 3.2 million pit bulls in the U.S. at any given time, according to the annual ANIMAL PEOPLE surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption via online classified ads.

    Thus in 2013 about one pit bull in 107 killed or seriously injured another animal, compared with about one dog in 50,000 of other breeds.

    Complete details of the year-long epidemiological survey that produced these estimates will appear in the January/February edition of ANIMAL PEOPLE.

  • Brandi Newton Shelton

    I have 3 pits and a rott. My dogs are all wonderful pets!! They adore my 3 children and are raised with 4 indoor cats!!! Trust them with my life. They sleep with my kids…so sick of the stereotyping of “bully breeds”..

*/